Kellogg Reaches A Tentative Deal With The Union Negotiating Team |

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Kellogg had been on the picket line for 2 months and has now reached a tentative agreement with the union negotiation team.

The deal calls for a 5-year labor contract that covers 1,400 workers at different cereal plants in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Michigan, and Omaha.

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The Union members from Confectionery, bakery, Grain Millers, and Tobacco Workers will vote on Sunday. 2 members from every plant will fly the locked boxes, filled with the votes, to Maryland. The votes will be counted there and if approved, they would return to work as soon as the next week.

Dan Miller was on the picket line in Omaha and stated that he wanted to get a lot of clarification from their leaders that negotiated the contract and let them have their say on how they came to the final decision.

The tentative deal comes during the fourth time the negotiating team met with Kellogg management.

The Highlights Of The Kellogg Agreement

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The agreement that Kellogg offered to the workers was that the wage was increased for everyone including a 3% hike upon ratification for legacy employees. They had also defined an accelerated path for transitional employees to legacy wages and other benefits.

Kellogg offered to increase the pension multiplier for the Legacy employees and enhance the benefits package for all its employees.

The sticking point for striking workers was the company’s plan to cap the number of transitional workers and not promote them with higher pay.

Dan Osborn, who is the BCTGM local 50 President, said that if the contract was not ratified they would continue the strike.

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